Weixi Lin | Moments in Time

Text by S.

Moments in Time | Photography by Weixi Lin
Moments in Time | Photography by Weixi Lin

As the youngest photographer, Weixi Lin was invited to attend “Beyond One Step” Biennale (2013) in Derby Museum, UK, and Lishui International Photography Festival (2013). The photography series exhibited was this project Moments in Time taken by phones.

Why does it have to be phone photography? Her answer is headstrong, but honest, “Cameras could not reach the speed of catching anything inspired in very short moments, but smartphones do. Also, the phone I am holding all the time, recording any moment impressing me, deciding the colors and frame sizes emotionally, helps me to remember how I was in that moment – this is why my project’s name is Moments in Time. Specially, when recording has become an irreplaceable part of my life, tools don’t matter anymore.”

It minds me how Walter Benjamin disputed the futile thoughts about the question of whether photography is an art in nineteenth-century – The primary question — whether the very invention of photography had not transformed the entire nature of art — was not raised. I bet he could never imagine the fashion of phone photography has brought a historic impact on camera photography. Do not agree? See how many complaints are there in social networks since Instagram has been censored.

If compare human eyes to a camera, this could be the one with 576 million pixels, an absolute extreme value. This is the reason why our visual experience is always ahead of other senses. How to capture this experience in the most immediate way? Nothing could compare the smartphone you are holding in hands all the time, just as Weixi Lin mentioned in her interview.

What She Was Looking For – this has been the main question along with me when I look at this group of photographs. Perhaps she did not sense it and never tried to put this “Looking For” in her shooting schedule. It seems that kinds of strong subconscious invests with power and innocence in Lin’s photography — the unbalanced junction, boundless ocean, strangers’ backs, shape of filament, snow traces, withered branches, reflective shoes standing on the bloody floor, bottomless swirl, etc. She has broken the boundaries between one project corresponds to one content or narrative, which is like puzzle pieces, as long as you put them together, the whole story of life makes sense.

“Moments in Time” was mainly taken in a very critical year of Lin’s. In that year, Lin lost one of most important person in life. With the huge sense of sadness and emptiness, she started over in a completely new country immediately. Precisely because of the fear of attacking by blank, she has to shoot and record constantly, trying the best to refill the black hole in heart, and to tidy up the fleeting moments in life. The most attractive part of this phone photography project is that Lin hangs herself in whether high saturation color photographs or high contract black and white pictures to express the struggles and fights she has been going through with strong emotions.

Maybe the one she has been looking for — is just self.

Moments in Time | Photography by Weixi Lin
Moments in Time | Photography by Weixi Lin
Moments in Time | Photography by Weixi Lin
Moments in Time | Photography by Weixi Lin
Moments in Time
Moments in Time

WEIXI LIN is a photographer who was born in 1990, based in Hangzhou, China. Graduated in Nottingham Trent University, MA Photography, 2012, Weixi Lin has been exploring photography and installation art with practice and critical thinking. She worked as an editor and book designer in Zhejiang Photographic Press.

Kayan Kwok | Surreal Banana Collage Posters

Day 101 | All images courtesy of Kayan Kwok
Day 101 | All images courtesy of Kayan Kwok

Kayan Kwok is an artist, illustration and a graphic designer based in Hong Kong.

The founder of ” a k e k e ” and co-founder of ” A.D.1.2 Artist Cooperate Organization“.She has been doing a project called “ A poster per day for 365 days ” by making a poster per day till it hit 365 days.

Vintage, retro, pin up, collage are the keywords for her works, she also is fascinated by the advertisment duing the 1920 – 1960 in American. Therefore her work reflected certain element from back then but then she also added some graphic design element, which make it different from traditional collage.

Collage has a surrealism background, but other then that, it also act like Alchemy, because you are putting stuff together from different places and times, the result is clearly unpredictable and this is what makes collage so fascinated.

Day 102 | All images courtesy of Kayan Kwok
Day 102 | All images courtesy of Kayan Kwok
Day 103 | All images courtesy of Kayan Kwok
Day 103 | All images courtesy of Kayan Kwok
Day 107 | All images courtesy of Kayan Kwok
Day 107 | All images courtesy of Kayan Kwok
Day 116 | All images courtesy of Kayan Kwok
Day 116 | All images courtesy of Kayan Kwok

Check more of Kayan Kwok’s work: http://www.designboom.com/design/kayan-kwok-banana-posters-per-day-for-365-days-graphic-design-hong-kong-09-07-2014/ 

 

Xu Hao | Shanshui

Hoa Xu Nr. 13 Silver gelatin print on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper 20.5 × 25.5cm unframed 2014
Hao Xu
Nr. 13
Silver gelatin print on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper 20.5 × 25.5cm unframed
2014

Shanshui, the name given to this body of work, draws from the aesthetic characteristics of Chinese landscape painting and uses traditional, analogue photographic materials and techniques. Shanshui in Chinese means ‘mountain’ and ‘water’ as landscape. The project explores the boundaries between photography and painting, referencing the fundamental principles of each field and and its specificity. It challenges the visual language of photography and painting, re-thinking the space between them.

Hao Xu’s initial inspiration came from the exhibition Masterpieces of Chinese painting: 700-1900 exhibited at the Victoria and Albert museum in London. Hao studied the different elements and components of the Chinese art displayed at this exhibit, which included screen painting and scroll painting. He began to comprehend the difference between monocular perspective (which the optics of the camera inherited) and the multi-vanishing point, roll and frame, meticulous painting and colour block used in Chinese painting. Hao began to consider the possibility of a synthesis between Eastern and Western aesthetics, creating a different way of using colour in photography.

At first Xu’s artwork was influenced by ‘grand impressionistic painting’. Chinese call it ‘Xie yi painting’. ‘Xie’ in mandarin is considered as writing. Why write a painting? One of the reasons is that grand impressionistic painting was influenced by the mandarin character and the creation of Chinese letters was derived from nature. Chinese characters are descriptive yet also a form of abstract painting. ‘Writing’ becomes
a process of narrating with unique embellishments and creative composition,
rather than describing a fact. ‘Yi’ in mandarin is considered full of meaning. Grand impressionistic painting represents the sentiment of the spiritual instead of describing physical reality. It imposed restrictions on space, light, perspective, and colour.

Inspired by Chinese painting, Hao Xu uses a process driven combining painting, drawing and camera less photography. By dipping, spraying, rotating and brushing the liquid developer, cyanotype chemical and argyrotype chemical, to respectively mix ink washes in blue and green, Hao creates a new form of Shanshui. The blue and green elements arise from the combination of developer and cyanotype chemicals. The glossy appearance of the prints comes from the combination of argyrotype chemical and developer. The various depth of tone and colour comes from altering the exposure, developing time, solarisation and UV light in the darkroom.

Hao Xu (b.1987, Xuchang, China and based in London) is a graduate of the MFA Photography course at the University for the Creative Arts, Farnham. Hao has exhibited and published work internationally. In the last year, he has participated in group exhibitions at the James Hockey & Foyer Galleries, Crypt Gallery, The Art Fund Prize Gallery and Central Saint Martins in the United Kingdom as well as Photo Shanghai art fair. The artist has participated in artist residencies both in Russia and India. Reviews, interviews and portfolio features have appeared in Fotografia Magazine, Art Photo Magazine and World Photography Organisation online.

 

Hao Xu Nr. 35 Silver gelatin print on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper 53 × 65cm unframed 2014
Hao Xu
Nr. 35
Silver gelatin print on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper 53 × 65cm unframed
2014
Hao Xu Nr. 37 Cyanotype on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper 53 × 65cm unframed 2014
Hao Xu
Nr. 37
Cyanotype on Hahnemühle Fine Art Paper 53 × 65cm unframed
2014

To see more of Xu Hao’s work: http://haoxu.co.uk/

 

Courtesy of the Chandelier Project, London

Chandelier Projects was founded in September 2013. We show contemporary art in a range of media by artists who are interested in creating a new or carefully curated exhibition with us as an extension of their studio practice. To accompany each project, we publish an essay or piece of writing which further expands upon or contextualises the artist’s work.

http://chandelierprojects.com/